How to Cut a Mango

Jump to Recipe

Learn how to cut a mango using a few simple techniques to yield the most fruit. The bright orange sweet flesh can be sliced or diced and be enjoyed as a stand-alone snack or added to various recipes.

Photo of a white bowl filled with mango cubes

Sweet, tart and juicy golden flesh of ripe mangos is a sought out tropical fruit, especially when at their peak season in the spring and summer. The only hesitation in adding the fruit to recipes is the seemingly daunting task to remove the flesh.

The thick skin cannot be quickly blanched and peeled off like tomatoes, and there is a relatively large pit in the center, making it more difficult to cut. However, those mere obstacles shouldn’t stop you from treating yourself to this fragrant fruit. Follow these simple step-by-step instructions on how to cut a mango with ease!

How to Cut a Mango

The following guide is my preferred method to yield the most flesh from a mango. It only requires four major cuts and then scoring the flesh to make slices or cubes.

All you need is a sharp knife (chefs knife is recommended, but a paring knife will work) and a large spoon. If you prefer removing the skin from the mango before cutting, a Y-peeler will come in handy. Be careful when cutting, as the flesh can be very slippery.

Step 1: Slice off the sides, aka “cheeks”

Photo of a person showing how to cut a mango

Place the mango flat on the cutting board, with the bottom sitting upright and the stem pointing up. The goal is to cut as much of the cheek off from the long and oblong white pit in the center of the mango.

It’s best to cut from the widest and more flat sides of the mango first to obtain the most flesh. Position the knife adjacent to the center of the stem, cutting along the sides of the pit. You will yield two large oval pieces of fruit.

Person using a chefs knife to cut a mango

Cut the two small sides off the mango to remove the flesh from the seed. There will be four total pieces of fruit. You can cut the remaining mango flesh attached to the seed, or if you’re like me, reward yourself by eating around the pit for a quick well-deserved snack!

Step 2: Score the Flesh

Person using a chef's knife to score the flesh of a mango

Holding the mango steady on the cutting board. Make long slits lengthwise to create multiple parallel lines of desired thickness. To make cubes, turn the mango 90 degrees and cut similar sized lines perpendicular to the other tracks as to form a crosshatch pattern. Be careful not to cut through the mango skin. Score the two smaller pieces similarly for slices or cubes.

Step 3: Scoop the Flesh

Hedgehog formation on a piece of mango

Now you can remove the mango pieces two ways. The first method is called the “hedgehog.” Hold the scored mango cheeks with two hands. Then placing thumbs on the flesh side of each end, use the middle and index fingers to push and invert the skin.

This process makes the mango appear like the quills of a hedgehog. You can then use a paring knife to remove the pieces. Note that this technique only works well for mango cubes.

Person using a spoon to scoop out cubes of mango

The second and easier method is to hold the scored mango cheek in your hand. Then using a large spoon to scoop out the fruit, scraping as close to the flesh as possible. Now your possibilities for using mango are endless! Try it with grilled chicken or grab some chips and make a mango salsa.

Storing

Once the mango is cut, store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. Cut mangos can also be placed in a resealable plastic bag in portions to be used in recipes later like in smoothies. To prevent them from sticking together, you can also put the mangos on a small parchment paper-lined sheet pan, freeze until hardened, and then transfer to a resealable bag for storage in the freezer.

Nutritional benefits of mangos

The delightful flavor of mango or Mangifera indica L. also packs a nutritional punch. Mangos are high in fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. You can see the beta-carotene in the flesh, giving its characteristic orange hue. In a one-cup serving of diced mangos, there are approximately 121 calories, 2 grams of fiber, 26 g carbohydrates, 46 mg vitamin C, and 1262 IU vitamin A, plus other nutrients (Source: USDA Nutrient Database).

Pin this recipe to save for later

Pin This

How to Cut a Mango

Learn how to cut a mango using a few simple techniques to yield the most fruit. The bright orange sweet flesh can be sliced or diced and be enjoyed as a stand-alone snack or added to various recipes.
Pin Print Review
3.72 from 52 votes
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Total Time5 mins
Servings 4 servings
Course Side
Cuisine American

Ingredients

  • 1 mango

Instructions 

  • Place the mango flat on the cutting board with the bottom sitting upright and the stem pointing up.
  • Position and cut the mango from the widest and most flat side first to obtain the most flesh.
  • Position the knife adjacent to the center of the stem, cutting along the sides of the pit.
  • Cut the two small sides off the mango to remove the flesh from the seed. There will be four total pieces of fruit.
  • Hold the mango steady on the cutting board. Make long slits lengthwise to create multiple parallel lines of desired thickness.
  • To make cubes, turn the mango 90 degrees and cut similar sized lines perpendicular to the other lines to create a crosshatch pattern. Be careful not to cut through the mango skin.
  • Score the two smaller sides similarly for slices or cubes.
  • Use a large spoon to scoop out the flesh of the mango from the skin. Use immediately.

Notes

  • Recipe Yield: 1 mango yields about 1 cup (187g) of diced mangos depending on the size of the fruit.
  • Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days, or store in resealable bags in the freezer for later use.

Want to save this recipe?

Create an account easily save your favorite content, so you never forget a recipe again.

Register now

Nutrition Facts
How to Cut a Mango
Amount Per Serving
Calories 30
% Daily Value*
Potassium 74mg2%
Carbohydrates 8g3%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 7g8%
Protein 0.3g1%
Vitamin A 350IU7%
Vitamin C 16.5mg20%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Tried this recipe?

Tag @jessica_gavin on Instagram. I'd love to see how it turns out!

Tag @jessica_gavin

Filed under:

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy.

Jessica Gavin

I'm a culinary school graduate, cookbook author, and a mom who loves croissants! My passion is creating recipes and sharing the science behind cooking to help you gain confidence in the kitchen.

Jessica's Secrets: Cooking Made Easy!
Get my essential cooking techniques that I learned in culinary school.
Jessica Gavin standing in the kitchen

You May Also Like

Reader Interactions

10 Comments Leave a comment or review

  1. Ellen Jacobs says

    Finally gave me the confidence to buy a mango! Did option 2, but at the last minute, instead of using a spoon, used my grapefruit cutter. Started with the 1st row, then cut away that peel so I could see how close I could get to the peel for the rest of the rows. Thanks so much.

  2. Patt Gavin says

    You have the greatest last name! And I’m glad I found your site. Your way of cutting a mango is much better than mine. I usually grab a large knife and attack it like Indiana Jones cutting through the jungle.

  3. Vinny says

    ok, now that I completed the mango cubing thing…what can I do with the big pit? Will it grow mangoes??

    • Jessica Gavin says

      Hi Vinny- I think you could try to germinate the seed to eventually plant and grow into a tree. I haven’t tried it though, let me know if you have success!

Leave A Reply

Recipe Rating