How to Seed a Pomegranate

How do you cut a pomegranate without making a huge mess? Here is a guide on how to seed a pomegranate in just a few easy steps in addition to a few ways to add them to your meals.

Here is a guide on how to seed a pomegranate in just a few easy steps in addition to a few ways to add them into your meals.

Pomegranates are natures way of delivering excellent health benefits! These superfruits have beautiful ruby gems inside and are packed with vitamins, fiber, and polyphenols. From October through February is when you’ll find this incredible fruit in season.

The sweet and tangy seeds, or “arils” are protected by a hardened outer layer and encased in an inedible membrane. It may look intimidating to attempt to get the juicy seeds out from inside that thick skin, but I have a few smart tips to get them out in a cinch without making a mess.

Watch How to seed a pomegranate:

For the step-by-step instructions, below is a breakdown of the entire process

STEP 1: Cutting the Pomegranate

Knife cutting off the crown and the bottom of the pomegranate.

To avoid staining your cutting board, layer it with few sheets of paper towel. This process helps to absorb some of the juice as you make your cuts and also helps for easy cleanup. Use a sharp chef’s knife to cut off the crown and the bottom of the pomegranate.

Knife slicing shallow scores along the side of a pomegranate

Next, make four shallow knife scores along the side of the pomegranate. This will allow you to open and separate the tough outer skin and to break the fruit into pieces.

Note, if the juice does saturate the board or you forget to line with paper, I’ve found that rubbing the surface with a cut lemon helps lift the color from the board. Rinse with water and repeat until the red is magically gone!

STEP 2: Separating the Pomegranate

Hand separating a pomegranate fruit to reveal the seeds inside

Holding the pomegranate from the crown and the base, use gentle force to divide the pomegranate in half along the cuts. Continue to separate the pomegranate until you have four sections.

STEP 3: Seed the Pomegranate

Sections of pomegranate in a bowl of water

Fill a large bowl with water. Place each section into the water, then submerge and work with your fingers to loosen the seeds from the membrane. This process helps to prevent the juice from splattering and staining surfaces or your clothes.

Pomegranate seeds being scooped in a strainer

The seeds will sink to the bottom of the bowl, and the white membrane will float to the top. Use a spoon, strainer or your hands to remove and discard the white pieces. Pour the bowl full of pomegranate seeds and water into a strainer. Wash the seeds under a faucet and remove any broken arils or remaining membrane pieces.

Selecting and Storing Pomegranates

Selection: The Fall and Winter months are perfect times to incorporate this bright and vibrant fruit into your recipes. When selecting a pomegranate, visually look for a rind that is a deep reddish color with possible brown hues. When you pick up the fruit, it should feel relatively heavy for its size, meaning the seeds are nice and plump. Inside the arils should look ruby red. The darker it is, the sweeter, lighter tends to have a more tart and astringent juice.

Storage: Whole pomegranates can last up to a month on the countertop, or one-to-two months in the refrigerator. Fresh arils can last up to one or two weeks in a sealed plastic container in the fridge but check for freshness each day. Frozen arils can last for months in the freezer for year-round enjoyment!

How to Eat Pomegranates

Now that you are a master at seeding a pomegranate, it’s time to have fun by adding them to your meals! The seeds can be eaten whole, or you can make homemade pomegranate juice. Just blend the seeds, straining the pulp over a bowl and pressing to release as much liquid as possible. They are great for adding to salads, oatmeal, cereal, yogurt, smoothies, ice cream, sauces, desserts, and even savory dishes!

Tasty pomegranate recipes to try

Did you find this guide helpful? I’d love to hear how you add pomegranate to your day in the comments section below!

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Jessica Gavin

I'm a culinary school graduate, cookbook author, and a mom who loves croissants! My passion is creating recipes and sharing the science behind cooking to help you gain confidence in the kitchen.

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11 Comments Leave a comment or review

  1. Barbara Blackwell says

    Great Tutorial and SO much better than how I’ve tackled this in the past!

    Thanks for the tip – your site is wonderful!

  2. Maria says

    I’m prefer plant base recipes, I’m vegan. Mi favorite food, Middle East, Greek. Some asiática. Thanks.
    I love you site, every definition is clear. Sorry for my inglés.????

  3. Charlene says

    Good job, very clear! I winced when you were cutting the rind while holding the fruit in your hand. I’ll set the pomegranate on the board when I cut. Thanks so much for video and recipies. Will try them today in apple/celery/grape salad.

  4. Jarvis Laninga says

    I needed to write you one little note to help say thank you again with your precious secrets you’ve contributed on this site. It is so particularly generous with you to allow without restraint exactly what many individuals would have distributed for an electronic book to end up making some cash for their own end, primarily since you could possibly have done it if you ever decided. The good ideas in addition acted like a fantastic way to fully grasp other people have a similar desire like my personal own to figure out lots more when considering this problem. I think there are a lot more pleasant moments up front for folks who find out your blog.

  5. Ehis says

    Thank you so much for the tutorial.
    You make it so easy.
    Going on a weight loss diets, I need all of this and even more.
    Shukran!

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