Types of Bread Crumbs

7

This post may contain affiliate links | disclosure policy

When a recipe calls for bread crumbs, you actually have a handful of options.

Different types of bread crumbs spread out on table

From binding ingredients in meatloaf and meatballs to adding crunch to casseroles, bread crumbs have a lot of jobs in the kitchen. They are even used to thicken soup and stews. So let’s talk about the different types of bread crumbs you can use. They fall into two categories: store-bought and homemade.

Fresh toasted

Fresh toasted bread crumbs in a bowl

When making homemade bread crumbs you can grind up day-old bread at home in a food processor and toast it in the oven with a drizzle of olive oil. Some home cooks will also add more flavor by sprinkling them with garlic salt and pepper.

Fresh untoasted

fresh untoasted bread crumbs in a bowl

When making this version you can forego toasting them when you need a softer, more absorbent texture. These are often used to bind ingredients and improve the texture in soups and meats.

Panko

panko bread crumbs in a bowl

Panko is typically store-bought and always made with white bread, sometimes with the crust and sometimes without. The former is referred to as white panko and the latter tan panko. It’s flakier and not as fine as other forms of bread crumbs and absorbs less oil, which tends to bring a crunchier texture to dishes. It’s commonly used in Asian cuisine but has become more common in western dishes as well.

Plain

plain bread crumbs in a bowl

While the packaged plain bread crumbs you see in stores are sometimes knocked for tasting stale, they can still add a lot of texture to dishes and can simplify cooking when you don’t want to go through the trouble of making your own.

Italian

Italian bread crumbs in a bowl

Italian bread crumbs are another common option on store shelves. They’re simply regular bread crumbs with Italian seasonings like oregano and basil. They also contain salt, pepper, parsley flakes, and garlic and onion powders.

How long will bread crumbs last

Store-bought bread crumbs last about 6 months in your pantry but longer in the fridge (about 2 years). If making homemade bread crumbs, store them in the freezer for up to three months.

Cracker crumbs and rolled oats can be used in place of bread crumbs. Quinoa can also make a good substitute, or you can try crushed cereal flakes.

What are the ways to use bread crumbs?

There are different types of bread crumbs to use in cooking depending on the application and finished dish. Bread crumbs, fresh or dry, are often used in meat mixtures to bind moisture and provide a more tender texture. The perfect example is using a panade in meatballs or meatloaf. The starches in the bread bind to the liquid, keeping the food juicy instead of being lost during the cooking process.

Bread crumbs like traditional or panko are used as a coating/breading for recipes like chicken parmesan, chicken tenders, fried fish, and tempura. It can also add an interesting crunch to top on salads, baked pasta dishes like macaroni and cheese, or green beans.

Jessica Gavin

I'm a culinary school graduate, cookbook author, and a mom who loves croissants! My passion is creating recipes and sharing the science behind cooking to help you gain confidence in the kitchen.

Quick & Easy Meals in Under 30 Minutes!
Get 25 simple meals your whole family will love.
Jessica Gavin standing in the kitchen

You May Also Like

Reader Interactions

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 Comments Leave a comment or review

    • Jessica Gavin says

      1 cup of raw quinoa makes about 3 cups cooked. So from a volume standpoint use the same amount of cooked quinoa to bread crumbs.

  1. Margaret Elaine Feldmann says

    Pepperidge Farm stuffing (crumbed in a food processor) is a great option for bread crumbs!! I have baked chicken strips dipped in milk and rolled in Pepperidge Farm stuffing. Melted butter is drizzled over the strips, which are then baked at 400 degrees for 23 minutes. Perfect. I am eager to try baking the chicken on a greased rack to produce a crust on the bottom of the chicken.