The Best Steak Marinade

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This easy steak marinade recipe is the BEST, and it will quickly add tons of flavor to any cut of beef! The mixture is a blend of soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, onion, garlic, honey, olive oil, and fresh herbs.

New York Strip steak marinating in a dish

A juicy steak can instantly make your mouth water. It’s a meal that’s simple to prepare and cooks in minutes. An easy steak marinade can add an exciting dimension and enhance the flavor to most cuts of beef. The right combination of key ingredients like salt, oil, acid, sweeteners, and aromatics can take the taste to the next level.

This marinade recipe is a combination of soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, onion, garlic, honey, olive oil, salt, pepper, rosemary, and thyme. Each ingredient plays an essential role to make every bite of steak more tasty and tender! You can cook the steaks by grilling, broiling, or pan searing for the ultimate experience.

Steak marinade mixture in a white bowl with a whisk

How a steak marinade increases flavor

The benefits of a marinade are two-fold; boost flavor and tenderness. To maximize the taste portion, I selected specific ingredients that bump up the flavor level.

  • Fat: Olive oil solubilizes fat-soluble flavor compounds from rosemary, thyme, and black pepper. The oil flavors the surface and helps the ingredients stick.
  • Infused Flavors: Water-soluble compounds like salt, soy sauce, onions, and garlic.
  • Glutamates: Soy sauce, garlic, and onions provide unique umami flavors.
  • Sweetener: A small amount of honey balances the salt and helps to encourage quicker browning.
  • Acid: Worchestire sauce is a popular condiment, mainly composed of distilled white vinegar and other umami inducing flavors. A smaller ratio of acid is used because marinating too long can cause the surface of the meat to become mushy and dry, instead of tender.

Pouring marinade over steak in a baking dish

Marinating makes the meat more tender

Steaks vary in the level of toughness of texture based on the location, and ultimately the cut of meat. You almost never see filet mignon marinated because the muscle fibers aren’t as actively used, yielding soft and tender pieces that are easy to eat.

On the other hand, marinating a flank steak that has more coarse muscle fibers has benefits. Also, thicker 1 1/2-inch and more massive steaks like ribeye or New York strip are great candidates for a marinade to add layers of flavor.

Salt makes a steak juicy

The best way to tenderize a steak is to add salt. It functions similarly to a brine, allowing the salty marinade to infuse into the meat through osmosis. According to America’s Test Kitchen, salt does four things:

  1. Loosens the meats muscle fibers making it easier to eat.
  2. Protein molecules in the meat restructure and create gaps that fill with water.
  3. Dissolves some muscle proteins and becomes sponge-like, grabbing moisture.
  4. Naturally enhances and seasons meat.

The final result is a more juicy, seasoned steak!

Comparison of two New York Strip steaks with different marinating times

How long to marinate a steak

It often seems that the longer the marination time, the better. Right? Wrong! It’s all about balancing flavor and moisture. And the reality is, the flavors from the marinade cannot get right into the center of the meat. However, sodium glutamates and salt go pretty far. I’ve found that a minimum of 30 minutes and optimally 1 hour is just enough time to flavor the meat while keeping it moist

So how long is too long? If there is an acid present like lemon juice, or vinegar, marinated overnight over 24 hours is max. Because the marinade for this recipe is soy-based with vinegar, adding too much time can make the beef taste more cured, mushy, and dry. Imagine beef jerky. Less aggressive marinades could be used longer. However, testing is always the best way to find out.

Juicy New York Strip steak slices on a cutting board

This versatile marinade is perfect for any cuts of steak, but preferably tri-tip, flank, skirt, New York Strip or ribeye. Grilled steak, pan-searing, or reverse searing are my methods of choice to quickly cook the meat and develop a nice crust by the Maillard browning reaction. You have the flexibility to use this marinade as a base and switch up the flavors depending on your mood. Time to get cooking!

More steak recipes

Serve with more marinade

It’s best to apply a more salt-based marinade to the meat before cooking to make it juicer. This process attracts the most flavor to the surface with limited movement to the interior of the meat. Then after cooking, serve the meat with additionally reserved marinade but with slightly more acid to boost the flavor even further.

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The Best Steak Marinade

Quick & easy steak marinade recipe made of soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, onion, garlic, honey, olive oil, and fresh herbs.
Pin Print Review
3.92 from 205 votes
Prep Time1 hr 10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Servings 2 people
Course Entree
Cuisine American

Ingredients

  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ cup minced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons sliced green onions
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 teaspoons chopped thyme
  • 2 teaspoons chopped rosemary
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 2 steaks, (ribeye, New York strip, porterhouse, T-bone, skirt, sirloin, flank, flat iron)

Instructions 

  • In a medium-sized bowl whisk together soy sauce, olive oil, Worcestershire sauce, red onion, honey, green onions, garlic, thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper.
  • In a small bowl add ¼ cup of the steak marinade and red wine vinegar, set aside.
  • Add steak to a baking dish or large resealable plastic bag.
  • Pour the marinade over, cover, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Press out the excess air if using a ziplock bag.
  • Flip steak over and marinate an additional 30 minutes in the refrigerator.
  • Remove the steak from the marinade and pat dry with paper towels to remove excess moisture from the surface.
  • Discard marinade.
  • Cook steaks using the desired cooking method, such as pan sear, reverse sear, or grill.
  • Transfer steak to a cutting board and tent with foil for 10 minutes before slicing.
  • Pour reserved marinade over the steak or serve on the side.

Notes

  • Recipe Yield: 1 cup of marinade. One cup of marinade is needed per 2 pounds of steak. Increase recipe size as needed.
  • Cooking the Steak: Depending on the thickness of the meat and method, you will need to adjust the cooking time.
  • Grill: Preheat grill over high heat (400 to 450ºF). Carefully grease the cooking grid with the oil. For steaks 3/4 to 1-inch thick: Sear covered for 3 to 5  minutes on each side, depending on the desired doneness. Steaks 1 1/2 to 2-inches thick: Sear as directed above, then place on the indirect heat side of the grill covered, to finish cooking for 8 to 14 minutes, depending on the desired doneness. 
  • Pan Sear: Heat a large cast iron or stainless steel pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add 1 tablespoon of oil and allow to heat. Sear steak for 3 to 5  minutes on each side, depending on the desired doneness. This method is best for 3/4 to 1-inch thick steaks. 
  • Reverse Sear: Heat a large cast iron skillet in the oven at 275ºF (135ºC). Place steaks on a rack set in a baking sheet for 15 to 25 minutes, until it reaches 90 to 95ºF (32 to 35ºC) for medium-rare, or 100 to 105ºF (38 to 41ºC) for medium. Transfer skillet to stovetop and heat over high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of oil, once hot, sear the steak for 2 minutes, flip and sear 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, then sear the sides for a total of 2 minutes.  This method is best for 1 1/2 to 2-inch thick steaks.
  • Aim for an internal temperature:
    • 120 to 125ºF (49 to 52ºC) for medium-rare
    • 130 to 135ºF (50 to 57ºC) for medium
    • 140 to 145°F (60 to 63°C) for medium-well
  • Resting Time: Allow the steaks to rest for 10 minutes to account for an increase in temperature due to carryover cooking.
  • MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Use tamari or coconut aminos instead of soy sauce.

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Nutrition Facts
The Best Steak Marinade
Amount Per Serving
Calories 541 Calories from Fat 261
% Daily Value*
Fat 29g45%
Saturated Fat 7g35%
Cholesterol 144mg48%
Sodium 2197mg92%
Potassium 993mg28%
Carbohydrates 13g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Protein 52g104%
Vitamin C 2.1mg3%
Calcium 73mg7%
Iron 5.3mg29%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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Jessica Gavin

I'm a culinary school graduate, cookbook author, and a mom who loves croissants! My passion is creating recipes and sharing the science behind cooking to help you gain confidence in the kitchen.

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56 Comments Leave a comment or review

  1. Lauren Ean says

    What if you don’t eat steak medium rare? I eat my steaks well done. What are your instructions for cooking it well done.

  2. Eddy says

    Absolutely love this recipe, I have been cooking flank stakes and ribeye with this, thank you so much for such delicious marinade recipe.

  3. Lisa says

    What a wonderful marinade! I bought a tri-tip on sale yesterday, but I didn’t have my usual marinade ingredients on hand today, so I was looking for a good alternative that I could make without leaving the house. I found something even better! I wasn’t sure it would work on such a large cut of meat, but it was absolutely delicious! I even deglazed the pan with a good red wine, and served that with the tri tip. Yum!

  4. Wendelah says

    This sounds excellent. But I’m avoiding meat because the unsafe conditions in our meatpacking plants are making workers sick, and spreading Covid-19 into their communities.

    The workers picking fruits and vegetables in California are paid so poorly that they can’t afford to buy what they harvest (wtf!) but at least they’re at less risk because they’re outside.

    What a world.

  5. Paula says

    Jessica,
    I have a Jaccard 48 blade meat tenderizer. Do you ever use somethilike this or if using a marinade should I do both?

    Love ya kiddo!

  6. Tommy says

    Wonderful thanks do you have one for Boneless chicken thighs Oh by the way the steaks were marvelous!

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